The Hewitt Times The Hewitt School newspaper

Chinelo Okparanta Enlightens the Upperclasswomen

  Chinelo Okparanta is a young writer who hails  from Port Harcourt, Nigeria and currently lives in the United States. She is well-known for her short stories and has received numerous accolades. Her debut collection, Happiness Like Water, was Editor’s Choice for the New York Times Book Review and is considered by the Guardian to be one of the Best African Fiction pieces. Junior and senior English and...

The Dangers of Drugs and The Importance of Spreading Awareness

In the wake of multiple drug-related deaths in the private school community, the issue of drug safety is re- emerging; many of the schools that we at Hewitt like to compare ourselves to have been addressing the dangers of drug use with their students. As young people growing up in a fast-paced New York City environment, we are exposed to narcotics very early on. “[Drugs] can...

Gay Marriage Legalization

The Scan: Changing the Tides of Gay Marriage Legalization

What to say when cookies are served at the bistro…. Finally, it’s been too long. As to same-sex marriage, five more states will finally legalize gay marriage. Wait, but wasn’t that so four years ago? No. In 2011, New York recognized gay marriage; however, as progressive as we seem, New York was not the first state to legalize it; it was Hawaii, in 1996. For the...

Google Glass Withdrawal

Addiction is a scary thing. It can ruin people’s lives, and if it gets out of control, it can lead to unprecedented consequences. But have you ever heard of a pair of glasses becoming addictive? Google Glass, Google’s newest piece of wearable technology in the form of glasses, has become a serious addiction for one navy serviceman. Since his name has not been revealed, we do...

The cast of Black-ish. 
Credit:Black-ish Facebook

Review: Black-ish is Good-ish

Black-ish is the new Modern Family; it’s no coincidence that the two shows play back-to-back. Black-ish, the ABC sitcom created by Kenya Barris, attempts to raise awareness of the micro-aggressive remarks that many black families encounter. Since the black family central to the show, the Johnsons, is privileged, issues connecting race and class are discussed. Anthony Anderson, who plays a character named Dre, is a successful advertising executive and is married...